Entries on Sundays

Photo · · Tucson

Quiet

Hiram reading on a Sunday morning, reflected in mirrors.

Multiple reflections of Hiram reading in bed on a Sunday morning.

Note · · Tucson

Lane 9

Ken, bowling
Golden Pin Lanes
Lane 9
Hiram, bowling

We were looking for something to do and Ken suggested bowling. I don't remember the last time I went bowling. I think this was maybe the fourth time ever. Golden Pin Lanes, the last non-chain bowling center in town will close sometime in the next year. We decided to go there. 

Photo · · Tucson

Steamer Dots

Lighting work with vegetable steamer

"Open the pod bay doors Hal."
"I’m afraid I can’t do that Dave. Not until you return the vegetable steamer."

Reading · · Tucson

Monster Children, Issue 58

Monster Children, Issue 58

I love Monster Children because its images of surfing and skateboarding remind me of what it's like to be young; I love Monster Children because its writing reminds me it's okay to put into writing how annoying things can be; I love the Australia Issue of Monster Children because it reminds me that I'm not the only one annoyed by U.S. news.

The Australia Issue. A concept that started as one thing and ended up completely contrary to what I intended at the close, for better or worse. The initial idea came about in light of over a year of being completely assaulted on all fronts with nothing but news of the United States. Sick of nothing but the frumpy clown in the White House, we thought shining a light on our own country, warts and all, would offer brief respite if nothing else.

Alistair Klinkenberg: The Australia Issue, an Introduction

Note · · Tucson

Prototypes & Abominations

You form a prototype in your mind, based on your first exposure, and anything that deviates from that is an abomination. — Leela Punyaratabandhu

She's talking about stir fry, but it's a thought applicable in many other contexts.

Cineclub · · Tucson

78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene

78/52: Hitchcock's Shower Scene. Dir. Alexandre O. Philippe. 2017


I did not know that before Psycho was released in 1960, movie audiences were in the habit of coming and going throughout a film. Since Hitchcock kills off one of his films' leads early on in the picture (and perhaps to market intrigue), he required that no one would be seated once the movie had begun to be certain viewers wouldn't miss the film's most memorable scene.

As someone who has always been annoyed by vagabond theater audiences, I was fascinated to learn that. Even though it's probably just about the most mundane thing you can take away from 78/52, which is filled with lots more interesting facts and analysis

It's a documentary about a movie scene everyone knows — even people who have never seen it.